Ringworm

Ringworm is not a worm at all, but a fungus. It can affect dogs, cats, horses, guinea pigs and people. There are several species of this fungus. Some can be found in the soil and other species have adapted to live solely on animals. Some species can be transmitted from pets to people or from people to pets. The fungus “lives” on the surface of the skin, inside the hair shafts and around nail beds. A classic lesion in a pet is a rapidly expanding circular patch on the skin with hair loss and redness. Some animals can carry the
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Mast Cell Tumors

Mast Cell Tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant (cancerous) tumor in the dog. It is less common in the cat. Mast cells are a normal component of the immune system and are involved in the body’s response to tissue injury. What causes these normal cells to “turn on” and become tumors is not clear. There seems to be a breed predisposition. Boxers, Boston bulldogs, English bulldogs, bull terriers and Siamese cats are diagnosed with MCT more than other breeds. Sites of chronic irritation or inflammation are suspected in some cases and even a virus has been theorized. The bottom
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Lick Granuloma (Acral Lick Dermatitis)

Lick Granulomas are a fairly common skin problem of dogs. They appear as a thickened, hairless, eroded or ulcerated area of the skin, usually located on a lower limb within easy reach of the dog’s mouth. Any dog at any age can develop lick granulomas. There is no single cause for granulomas. Possibilities include infection, previous injury, allergies, joint disease, tumors, back pain, neck pain and even just being bored. The “classic” dog that develops a lick granuloma is a large breed, middle aged, male dog that doesn’t have enough to occupy his mind and time. Possible scenarios which lead
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